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Aristotle

Greek philosopher and scientist; b. 384 BCE; d. 322 BCE  ·  10 aphorisms  ·  no comments

Aphorisms Attributed to This Aphorist

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Commenttiny.ag/6lar7dwe  ·   Fair (870 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

Those who educate children well are more to be honored than parents, for these only gave life, those the art of living well.

Aristotle, in Wisdom and Ignorance

Commenttiny.ag/oujwgybq  ·   Fair (355 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

Wit is educated insolence.

Aristotle, in Wisdom and Ignorance

Commenttiny.ag/dc6pcq9o  ·   Fair (425 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

All men naturally desire knowledge.

Aristotle, in Wisdom and Ignorance

Commenttiny.ag/kwzypjqf  ·   Fair (475 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

All paid jobs absorb and degrade the mind.

Aristotle, in Work and Recreation

Commenttiny.ag/6wydulw8  ·   Fair (348 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.

Aristotle, in Wisdom and Ignorance

Commenttiny.ag/vo8qhfwa  ·   Fair (414 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

It is the mark of an educated mind to rest satisfied with the degree of precision which the nature of the subject admits and not to seek exactness where only an approximation is possible.

Aristotle, in Science and Religion

Commenttiny.ag/khtxcyl0  ·   Fair (389 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

It is unbecoming for young men to utter maxims.

Aristotle, in Wisdom and Ignorance

Commenttiny.ag/q2cvf8pi  ·   Fair (391 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

The educated differ from the uneducated as much as the living from the dead.

Aristotle, in Wisdom and Ignorance

Commenttiny.ag/wjruna0x  ·   Fair (394 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

The gods too are fond of a joke.

Aristotle, in Happiness and Misery

Commenttiny.ag/koyhdrgm  ·   Fair (838 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

The greatest virtues are those which are most useful to other persons.

Aristotle, Rhetoric, in Vice and Virtue

The Art of Rhetoric (paperback)

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